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Why Watching the Olympics is Good for Your Marks

Image by rapidtravelchai, Flickr

Image by rapidtravelchai, Flickr

Do you feel guilty about watching the Olympics this year? Like you really should be working on that assignment instead? Well, before you turn off the TV, we’ve got some news: it might actually be good for you, a student, to watch the infamous Games – and not just so you know what everyone’s talking about on Facebook.

The Olympics can be both inspirational and educational for students. No, we’re not just talking to those of you who happen to be athletes. We’re talking to students majoring in…well, everything.

Hear us out.

We’ve talked before about how you can’t get any better education than incorporating real-world experience into courses, and the Olympics gives you an opportunity to really see what goes on behind-the-scenes.

Still aren’t sold?

Here are some ways students in various majors can keep an eye on real-world happenings in their industry while completely enjoying the Olympic Games, guilt-free:

  • Marketing Students:

  • Over a billion dollars has already been spent on marketing at the Olympics. Can you see what it’s been spent on? Future marketers can watch for product placement and banners at the events themselves, and how companies all around the world take advantage of the buzz through commercials and social media. What’s the most effective marketing tactic for you?

  • PR and Journalism Students:

  • Sure to be one of the biggest news subjects of the year, watch the various events and figure out what you would write about. What do you think tomorrow’s big story will be? How would you handle a scandal for the media? What are the most tweeted events? Which news entity do you think is providing the best coverage?

  • Political Science Students:

  • Do you approve or disapprove of the way the Russian government is handling the event? What are your criticisms of it? What would you suggest for the use of the event venues after the Olympics to ensure the government doesn’t lose money?

  • Economics Students:

  • A lot of money has been spent on building new event venues and improving infrastructure for the Olympics. Would you have done anything differently? Do you think it was a worthwhile idea to spend money on infrastructure and buildings now, in hopes Russia can recoup the costs later?

  • Travel and Tourism Students:

  • Although many people will be attending the Olympics in Sochi this year, some may be wary about visiting Russia in the future. How would you promote tourism here? What would you do to help people feel safe in the country? Are hotels and restaurants doing anything special for the Olympics to welcome tourists? How much have prices increased during the event?

  • Biology Students:

  • Which country is taking home the most medals? Do you see a relationship between medals won in certain sports and the countries these winners are from? Do you think the genetic makeup of a person has anything to do with their skill in a sport?

  • Urban Planning Students:

  • Over 8 billion dollars was spent building new roads, railways, and even a glass-front train station in Sochi. Pay attention to what transportation is like – are people complaining about congestion? Did the company in charge of infrastructure do enough (or not enough) to host the event?

  • Physics and Engineering Students:

  • Look into how the engineers built the platforms for various events – how do they perfect the icy track for the luge? How do the skiers make sure they rotate the right amount in the air? Pay attention to the angles and surfaces used in different winter sports. Have any innovative materials been used this year?

  • Psychology Students:

  • Listen to the interviews of various athletes before and after the events. Are the expected winners taking home medals? Is anyone cracking under pressure? What might influence their mentality at the games?

As you can see, as a worldwide event, the Olympics is not just a sports competition. Every industry is involved in some respect, and if you are passionate about your major, you’ll find how the Games relate to you. You’ll learn about the way it applies in a real-world situation, and you may even be able to work what you’ve learned into your next assignment.

Do Extracurriculars Add Value to My College Experience?

Image by stevendepolo, Flickr

Image by stevendepolo, Flickr

Post-secondary education is all about finding and grabbing onto opportunities. Recognizing and taking advantage of opportunities can lead you to where you want to be in a surprisingly short amount of time. Extracurricular activities are full of opportunities that can help you get ahead, and certain clubs and societies you choose to join can have an impact on your professional portfolio even after you leave your post-secondary school. But, is it worth your spare time?

Extracurricular activities are the key to enhancing your university experience. They are the places where students gather to share their interests, and it is where many opportunities and relationships are formed. If you’re a new student, extracurriculars are a great way to get involved with not only those your own age, but students in the upper years. Depending on the type of person you are, this can help you get comfortable and adjust to post-secondary life much easier and faster, and it can very much prepare you for your future.

Though they may seem like ways to have fun and do what you love, extracurricular activities can also be great for networking. That doesn’t mean you need to walk in on your first day and start asking about jobs, but the connections you build and relationships you form could one day lead there. For example, joining the university radio station could introduce you to various contacts in the radio industry, while at the same time, give you experience you can present to potential employers. Participating in a club or a society is the easiest way to create these networking contacts because of the social interaction that comes along with the activity. People within these networking circles are looking for others with potential, and doing your best in such a place can present you with a good employment or educational opportunity that could make your professional career so much better.

Seems great, right? Here’s the “beware” disclaimer: Remember that you have to juggle your lifestyle. Too much focus on extracurriculars may not leave enough time allotted to your schoolwork, part-time job, or other aspects of your life such as family and friends. Don’t overburden yourself by joining too many clubs and societies; it can have a negative impact on your studies. However, this is entirely individual. Some students thrive off joining different societies and it helps them stay motivated to do well in their studies. If you’re already feeling swamped with work and school, and you have club meetings to attend, it may not be worth the sacrifice. Plan carefully and don’t overburden yourself; ultimately your grades will get you your degree, and if you can balance your commitments, extracurriculars could land you your job.

We Asked Students What They Want to Know About College: Here’s What They Told Us

 

In an effort to provide students with the invaluable content they want to know for the next step of their educational careers, Students.org has been surveying high school and post-secondary students on what exactly they’re looking for online when it comes to this aspect of their lives. After poring over the results received so far, we knew we had to share them with you.

Our goal is to ensure the next generation of students is completely armed with the knowledge that will allow them to make informed decisions; not only about attending the post-secondary institution that’s right for them, but also in regards to their personal lives and future careers. With this in mind, check out the infographic below displaying our current survey results, and keep checking in with us as we begin to delve into these topics, day in and day out.
 
Want to provide your feedback? We’re still collecting data in our survey. Fill it out here.

From the Students Themselves: What They Want to Know

What students want to know about college

Who Do You Follow?

Image by ivanpw, Flickr - follow on twitter

Image by ivanpw, Flickr

 
 
Every student is going to have a different set of people they follow on social media, depending on their interests. You might be a diehard hockey fan and religiously check up on your favourite player. You might love sitting in a quiet corner of your house with a new book and scour @NYTimesBooks for ideas for your next read. You might be interested in the thoughts of business leaders and gather insight from @BillGates.
 
 
 
 
We want to know what your interests are. Who – or what – do you follow? Remember to share this page with your friends via the links at the top of the page so they can give their input too. We will summarize the results and provide you with a list of the most popular accounts to track on social media, as chosen by your peers.

This survey is currently disabled.

 

In the mood for another survey? Give us more of your insights here.

Welcome to Students.org!

Thanks for visiting Students.org. This site looks to provide high school and post-secondary students in North America with relevant content about everything “students” in hopes to engage, entertain, and enlighten you on your path to graduation. 

As a continuous work in progress, we are always looking for new content ideas. Do you have a suggestion? Please Contact Us and we’d be happy to write a post, just for you! Subscribe to our newsletter to be notified of our newest content. 

We are surveying high school and post-secondary students to determine what content is important to them. If you’d like to provide your input (anonymously), you can fill out the survey here.

Thanks for visiting, and we hope to see you back here soon!