Tag Archives | online

Accredited Schools Online

Accredited Schools Online

Students are used to being online, and these days, we’re not just open to online education – some of us even prefer it. But are we doing it right? It’s such a new phenomenon that there is still learning to be done about learning online. Accredited Schools Online created a guide to help students learn more effectively in these courses. The guide looks at Khan Academy, Coursera and MIT OpenCourseware specifically, and includes advice and keys to success from a panel of experts. Check out The Online Learning Guidebook here.

The guidebook talks about the benefits of online learning, such as convenience, cost effectiveness, and improved technology and learning skills. It guides students through what to expect when taking an online course, and even identifies which students are best suited for this type of learning based on the student’s qualities.

As online education continues to grow, many schools are making it a major part of their curriculum. To help students understand this trend, the guide also includes a detailed breakdown of online learning methods and technologies, as well as information on how to identify quality online schools or programs.

Leave your thoughts on the guidebook in the comments below.

This was contributed by guest Angela Hanners.

Image by Elvert Barnes, Flickr

Image by Elvert Barnes, Flickr

Friends and family aren’t the only ones checking your social media accounts; many recruiters do research on applicants by searching their names online. If you were a recruiter searching your name, would you like what you see? Several things from your profile picture to the things you post can be huge red flags to your potential employer. Here are some things you can do to prevent putting your career in danger:

Remember the two P’s of posting

No matter what or where you’re posting content, make sure they follow the two P’s of posting: your content is professional and positive. For example, if you want to complain about something, keep it PG and be sure to offer solutions. No one likes a whiner, but everyone appreciates someone who gives good constructive criticism.

Appearance is everything

Your picture tends to be the first thing anyone notices when they look at your profile. Make sure it is appropriate. Check anything else on your profile including text posts, other pictures, links, groups you’re in and things you’ve liked. Ensure that you have nothing on your profile that you would be embarrassed of if a recruiter were to see. This does not only include the stuff that you post. Check to see if your friends have any unsavoury pictures of you posted online.

Privacy settings

Review the privacy settings of your accounts to guarantee that only the people you want can view your profile. However, there are always ways for your potential employer to see your profile. It could be as simple as a shared friend that will give them access, so don’t expect to be safe just because you have all of the security settings up.

Stand out

All of these precautions don’t mean you should stop posting and being an active social media consumer altogether. You should use social media as much as possible to shine in the eyes of the recruiter. Liking Facebook pages or following Twitter accounts of industry experts is a great way to do so. LinkedIn is a wonderful website that helps you get noticed. Make your online presence count by joining LinkedIn groups related to your desired career path and start expanding your network early. If you want to join the public relations field or be a writer, consider starting a blog. Create a website and post your portfolio to let others see your amazing work. Overall, show recruiters that you have a personality and that you are a great fit for their company.

Do a vanity search

Do as the recruiters do and search yourself on the web. Think of yourself as a brand and social media as a marketing tool. Are you marketing yourself well? Not only are you using it carefully, but are you also using it wisely? Most importantly, do you seem valuable enough for your prospective employers to invest in you?